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Agenda Cultural

 

calle-quevedo

(Calle Quevedo)

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Previously called Calle Niño, Góngora lived in a house on this street. Apparently, Francisco de Quevedo was able to evict the poet and playwright for delayed rental payments, with the sole purpose of evicting his mortal enemy and to keeping the house for himself.

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Calle-cervantes

(Calle Cervantes, 2)

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Miguel de Cervantes lived in different places in Madrid, on Calle Magdalena, Calle León, in the Plazuela de Matute, Calle Huertas and on the corner of Calle León and Calle de Francos. This last house, where he died in 1616, was torn down in the 19th century and the new building has a commemorative plaza that pays tribute to the writer.

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(Calle Jacometrezo)

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Today, on this corner of Madrid there is a hotel and a fast food spot. Then, the Seminary of the Escoceses was located there. The Scottish Catholic Church, pursued since 1500, created a seminary in Madrid, the Real Colegio de Escoceses, to educate its priests.
It was there, on August 24, 1635, the the poet attended a conference on Medicine and Philosophy, during which he fainted. They carried him home, and he never went out again. Three days later, he died.
In Lope de Vega's time, the Seminary of the Escoceses was located on Calle Jacometrezo. The building was demolished upon opening the Gran Vía, and they gave them this building.

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Calle Atocha, 87

On Calle Atocha, next to Juan de la Cuesta's print shop, is the Nuestra Señora de los Desamparados Asylum where, in 1617, Lope locked up his son Lope Félix for his bad behavior.

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