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Agenda Cultural

 

(Tirso de Molina)

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The Rastro began as an open-air market of the offal and entrails from the animals killed in a nearby slaughterhouse. The name comes from the "rastro" (trail) of blood that ran down the streets. It is mentioned in works by several authors: La Guarda prodigiosa (Cervantes), La varona castellana (Lope de Vega), Hombre pobre todo es trazas (Calderón de la Barca) and El Caballero de Gracia (Tirso de Molina).

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(Plaza de Santa Ana)

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Today this is the Teatro Español.
In 1565, the Confraternity of the Sagrada Pasión was founded, which ran a corral de comedias. In 1567, the Confraternity of Nuestra Señora de la Soledad was created, with exactly the same idea. They joined forces in 1568, creating a monopoly on theatrical performances. Shortly thereafter, in 1579, the Corral de la Cruz and the Corral del Príncipe were built. In 1638 they were overcome with debt, so the City of Madrid decided to manage the two corrals directly and pay a fixed fee to the confraternities. The resemblance between the two corrales, Cruz and Príncipe, was remarkable, and of the two, the only that still runs as a theater is the Príncipe, now the Teatro Español.

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(Calle de la Cruz, Nuñez de Arce)

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Lope de Vega's plays were performed in the Corral de la Cruz and the Corral de Príncipe, but also, in December 1587 in La Cruz, the author was arrested in the middle of a performance for the libels written against Elena Osorio and her family.

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(Calle León)

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Performers, actors, business owners and poets regularly gathered in the mentidero (gossiping place) on the Calle León, where today there is a commemorative plaque. There was also the mentidero de San Felipe in the Puerta del Sol.

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